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Didgeridoo Faq and facts

Didgeridoo - FAQ & Facts

 

This page is to provide you differences, conical vs. didgeridoos. cylindrical, entry tools, materials, mouthpieces and more ...
 
 
 
It is for guidance and the "Homemade" philosophy.
 
 
 
 
 
- Beautiful sound: Sound is subjective, what pleases the one like the others still far .....
 
- Barking: sound outlet opening, the higher attaches the barking, the higher is the same length, the sound of the didgeridoo, also changes the sound spectrum.
 
- Mouthpiece: Mouthpiece is the top opening, depending on the size of the opening may be a didgeridoo played with or without a special mouthpiece. Mouthpieces are made of wax, wood, silicone, polymer clay ... it is also a matter of personal preference ...
 
- Mouthpieces for beginners ... as individual as each person is, even after several years of courses to students, I can not always say what a good mouthpiece for the beginner .... shape and size will depend very much on the personal feelings and from one's own anatomy.
 
- Conical: The didgeridoo is wider than the bottom up, it runs into a conical shape (the instruments rather straight and have only one barking at the end, I refer not so.) A conical didgeridoo usually has a louder sound than straight; It has more mids and highs - as cylindrical parts. The most vocal transport is less ausgeprägft well as on straight, but they have more backpressure, the Circular Breathing becomes easier, because the air will last longer, often such instruments are easier to "toot".
 
- Cylindrical: Didgeridoos with rel. straight course. These didgeridoos are often imbued with a strong bass, the voice is given very well again. Some are not so easy, "toot" or are not built for it (like many traditional Mago's). These didgeridoos usually need more air.
 
- Material and wall thickness: the material (wood, plastics, glass, etc. ..) is determined primarily by the "tone" oh dry, fed, warm, earthy, gnarled, singing overtones ..... softer materials (teak, jackfruit, pine, spruce ...) should have a rather thick Wandungsstärek, otherwise they tend to rattle when fair play, and the stability is not assured. Hard woods such as eucalyptus, beech wood can be made thin-walled fruit, the sound quality is much higher than for low instruments.
 
- Toots: Formed overblowing, "trumpeting" of this sounds more lip tension, or blow down (about 45 degrees) or above.
 
- Concert Class: These and other classifications are everywhere on the internet ... why? Explain the words! ... For me nothing should ...... A Konzertdidge for me was a very pleasant, well-balanced sound, I should like to play with it and it should be so good, the audience is enthusiastic.
 
Others want to maybe 5 to play 6.7 or more Toots and set your standards accordingly. Therefore there is no such designations at Positive Vibrations - Didgeridoo and More
 
- Beginner Class: I characterizing instruments which I think they are well suited for beginners:
 
These two types of "newcomers": A) just want to try any play time at home. B wants to) learn to play didgeridoo and have the same high-quality didgeridoo. Type B remains, ECTL also plays with others or even to occur sometime ..
 
Eisnteigerdidgeridoos for me (type A), bamboo, teak, jackfruit, fiberglass ... This should be easy to allude not cost too much.
 
For Type B: eucalyptus, teak, jackfruit #
 
Again, each person is different, has a different (lip) approach that plays differently, everyone does do something else easier.
 
Generally, I think that tools are among the pitches of C and E suitable for beginners and should have a length of about 125 cm to 150.
 
 
 
This didgeridoo FAQ list will grow with your questions and concerns on!

This page is to explain you differences, conical vs. cylindrical didgeridoos.  Entry level Didgeridoos, materials, mouthpieces and more ...

It should be a guidance and shows our own philosophy.

 

- Beautiful sound: Sound is subjective, what pleases the one, hasn´t tob be pleasant to others .....

 

- Bellend: sound outlet opening, the higher the bellend is positioned, the higher is the sound of the didgeridoo, if compared didges have the same length. Also  the sound spectrum changes.

 

- Mouthpiece: Mouthpiece is the top opening, depending on the size of the opening may be a didgeridoo played with or without a special mouthpiece. Mouthpieces are made of wax, wood, silicone, polymer clay ... it is also a matter of personal preference ...

 

- Mouthpieces for beginners ... as individual as each person is, even after several years of courses and students, I can not always say what is a good mouthpiece for the beginner .... shape and size will depend very much on the personal feelings and from one's own anatomy.

 

- Conical: The didgeridoo is wider at the bottom than upside, it runs into a conical shape (the instruments, that are rather straight and have only s samll bellend at the end, I refer not so.) A conical didgeridoo usually has a louder sound than a straight one; It has more mids and highs - as cylindrical parts. The vocal transport is less marked as on straight ones, but they have more backpressure, the Circular Breathing becomes easier, because the air will last longer, often such instruments are easier to "toot".

 

- Cylindrical: Didgeridoos with a rel. straight shape. These didgeridoos have often  a strong bass part, the voicetransport is very well marked. Some are not so easy, "toot" or are not built for "tooting" (like many traditional Mago's). These didgeridoos usually need more air.

 

- Material and wall thickness: the material (wood, plastics, glass, etc. ..)  primarily determines  the "colure of the sound" if it sounds dry, fat, warm, earthy, gnarled, singing overtones ..... softer materials (teak, jackfruit, pine, spruce ...) should have a rather thick wall, otherwise they tend to rattle when they are played louder, and the stability is not assured. Hard woods such as eucalyptus, beech, fruitwoods can be made thin-walled , the sound quality is much higher than for low kosts instruments.

 

- Toots: Formed overblowing, "trumpeting"create this sounds with more lip tension, or blow down (about 45 degrees) or above.

 

- Concert Class: These and other classifications are to find everywhere on the internet ... why? Explain the words! ... For me , it means nothing  ...... A concert didgeridoo for me, is a very pleasant, well-balanced sound, I should like to play with it and it should be so good, taht the audience is enthusiastic.

Others want  maybe  to play 5, 6.7 or more Toots and set their standards accordingly. Therefore there is no such designations at Positive Vibrations - Didgeridoo and More

 

- Beginner Class: I characterize instruments which I think they are well suited for beginners:

 

These two types of "newcomers": A) just wants to try and play sometimes at home.

) wants to learn to play didgeridoo and have a same high-quality didgeridoo. Type B keeps playing and also plays with others or even to wants to be on a stage somedays ..

 

Beginners didgeridoos for me (type A) are, bamboo, teak, jackfruit, fiberglass ... This should be easy to play not cost too much.

 

For type B: eucalyptus, teak, jackfruit 

 

Again, each person is different, has a different (lip) approach, plays differently.....

 

Generally, I think that Instrument among the key of C and E are suitable for beginners and should have a length of about 125 cm to 150cm.

 

 

 

This didgeridoo FAQ list will grow with your questions and concerns on!